Tag: window maintentance tips

  • Prepare Your Home for Winter

    Putting a little bit of money into your home to prepare for winter will keep you warmer and make your energy bills lighter.

    Caulking and weather stripping are the best ways to save energy without putting too much money down, according to House Logic:

    Weather-stripping can be done by a painting contractor, a window installation contractor, or any handyman firm and is usually bid by the job or by the window.

    It is also recommended that you increase attic insulation if the joists are showing through the old insulation.

    You can also get storm doors installed, primarily in the most drafty areas can save you up to 8% of your energy, according to House Logic.

     

  • How to Hurricane-Proof Your Windows

    Since Hurricane Sandy may show up by early next week, it's important that your family and your home, particularly your windows, are prepared to weather the storm.

    Here are some tips on how to Hurricane-Proof your windows before the storm comes, courtesy of House Logic:

    Add hurricane window film

    Tough, clear plastic hurricane film is popular because you can’t really see it, and you can leave it in place year-round. If the glass breaks, hurricane film prevents glass shards from zipping around inside your home.

    If you’re an average DIYer, you can install peel-and-stick hurricane film on your windows for a mere $25 per linear foot. As a bonus, the film blocks ultraviolet light that can fade carpets and fabric.

    The downside to hurricane film—and it’s a big one—is that the film isn’t strong enough to stop hurricane winds from blowing in the entire window frame. That’s why most insurance companies don’t offer discounts for hurricane film and why you should also shield your windows with plywood.

    Shield windows with plywood

    Good old plywood is one of the building industry’s toughest materials, and is hard to beat for storm protection. Some tips for using plywood to shield your windows:

    • Cut sheets of 1/2- or 5/8-inch-thick plywood. Make sure you overlap window frames by a good 8 inches all around.
    • Use heavy-duty screws and anchors (in wood) or expansion bolts (in masonry) to attach the plywood to your home’s walls (not the window frames).
    • Pre-install screw anchors around window openings to speed up installation.
    • Store shields in a handy location where you can reach them easily and put them up fast.
    • Keep your cordless battery charged so it’ll be ready to use when a storm is coming.
    • Keep extra flashlights and batteries handy in your home. It gets very dark inside once the plywood is installed.
    • Expect to spend $1 to $2 per square foot if you do the work yourself and $3 to $5 per square foot if you hire someone.

    Add storm shutters

    Because roll-up or accordion-type storm shutters are permanent, they’re a snap to deploy when a storm comes. All you have to do is pull the shutters into place before a hurricane to prevent damage and broken windows.

    If you’re skittish about being in the dark, look for shutters that have perforations or are made from tough translucent fiberglass that lets in light.

    Expect to spend anywhere from $10 to $50 per square foot for professional installation of storm shutters, depending on style and material.

    Install high-impact glass windows

    The great thing about windows with high-impact glass is that they’re always in place, ready to beat back anything hurled by hurricane-force winds. These brawny buddies are made up of two panes of tempered glass separated by a plastic film. They come in standard sizes and shapes so they won’t make your home look like a Brinks truck.

    Expect to pay three times as much for a window with high-impact glass as for a regular window of the same size and type.

    Ask about home insurance discounts

    To encourage you to take steps to minimize damage, your insurer might offer discounts for hurricane-mitigation improvements. In Florida’s Miami-Dade County, for example, the annual insurance premium on an older home insured for $150,000 runs between $3,000 and $8,000, assuming no hurricane-mitigation improvements. With improvements, such as storm shutters or high-impact glass, the same home would cost between $1,000 and $3,500 to insure.

    Also, here are some general tips, courtesy of House Logic, to prepare your family and home for a hurricane:

    • Make a grab-and-go bag with family finance and medical essentials like: Prescription and over-the-counter medicines, one change of clothes for each family member, a back-up drive from your computer, a copy of your home inventory, and a flash drive with copies of important documents like insurance papers, birth certificates, deeds, tax returns, passports, and drivers licenses.
    • Trim up your trees and shrubs to make them less vulnerable to summer storms.
    • Is your sump pump working? Replace it if it isn’t.
    • Load the phone number for your insurance agent and the company’s claims line into your cell phone.
    • Price a flood policy, especially if you live in a flood zone.

    Exterior Specialties of PA is here to help with all of your window installation, window repair, window replacement, and window maintenance needs.  Call us today at (215) 773-9181 for your FREE estimate!

  • Tips for Window Maintence

    Windows need regular maintenance because of the extreme temperatures and seasonal changes they face year-round.  Without regular maintenance, replacing your windows may come sooner and unmaintained windows can also take a toll on your heating and cooling bills.

    Therefore, the best way to get your windows to last is by maintaining them routinely. According to Facilitiesnet, your windows should be inspected yearly. All inspections should be done keeping your windows in mind because every window handles the elements differently.

    The interior surfaces of the window should be examined first for stains and rot, meaning water is leaking into the interior. Next check the fit of windows to see if any gaps have occurred between different components of the window, since these can change sizes when exposed to different elements. Also, open and close windows fully to see how easy they are to use. Difficulty opening a window could be a sign of warping. Examine caulking and seals between the windows and the finish on the windows as well. If you have wood windows, make sure to check for rot and decay.

    For more detailed information check out Facilitiesnet.

    At Exterior Specialties of PA, we are here to make your decisions easier. Our extensive knowledge and experience provides you with the comfort of knowing the job was done right. Call us today for a free estimate.