Tag: roofing

  • Criteria for Selecting the Right Roof

    courtesy of houselogic

    There are a lot of things to think about when replacing your roof or installing a new roof.  There are many different aspects of the home or building you have to think about when selecting the type of roof you need.

    Here are some criteria, courtesy of FacilitiesNet:

    Geographic Location:  This includes whether the property is located on the west coast or east coast, the north or south. But it also includes local considerations, such as the building's orientation and if there are nearby trees.

    Local Environmental Laws: What is allowed as far as applications, odors, VOCs.

    Building Characteristics: These include the slope of the roof, the shape of the building, the elevation and the level of accessibility to the roof.

    Appearance: Is the roof visible from the ground or visible from other buildings such that you have concerns about looking industrial or maybe want more of a green look to it with vegetation?

    Use of the Roof: How much foot traffic is going to be on the roof?

    Use of the Building: A hospital or a resort has different concerns with roofing and reroofing than an office building or a shopping center, as far as disturbance to the inhabitants. A library or a bank many times have concerns with the equipment set up, the noise, the disturbance to the customers. It's another thing to look at environmentally. One roof may be easier and quieter to install than another, all things being equal.

    Weather: Does a particular roof type have a vulnerability to hail, ice or snow damage? A particular type of roof may not be selected because of the incidence of hail in that area. Even if the owner is insured against hail damage, what is going to be effect of the inconvenience of having to go through a reroof?

    Quality of Maintenance: What is the quality of maintenance that will be available? Will there be an in-house maintenance crew that can be trained and is interested in the condition of the roof?

    Utility Costs: Is a reflective/cool roof important? For example, is the facility an office building where the owner is paying the utility cost or is the tenant paying the utility cost? It's a whole different animal. Some owners are very concerned about their tenant's utility costs as a selling point to keep their occupancy. Others don't care what their tenants have to pay; they just want a cheap roof.

    Exterior Specialties of PA is here to help with all of your pennsylvania roofing and siding, roofing installation, and roofing repair needs. Call us today at 215.453.9180 for your FREE estimate!

  • Types of Roofing Insulation

    Courtesy of fsec.ucf.edu

    The insulation a roof has is just as important as the roof itself.  The type of insulation you choose can effect your roofs performance life, but insulation must also fulfill your home's energy and thermal needs.

    Here is an overview of 7 types of roofing insulation, courtesy of FacilitiesNet:

    Wood fiber is an organic insulation board composed of wood, cane, or vegetable fibers mixed with fillers and binders. The insulation can be asphalt impregnated or asphalt coated to enhance moisture resistance. Managers should consider uncoated insulation in applications where the selected roof covering is incompatible with asphalt-based coatings.

    Perlite insulation board is composed of inorganic, expanded silicaceous volcanic glass — perlite — combined with organic fibers and binders. The top surface of the insulation board features an asphalt coating or a proprietary coating formulated to limit adhesive — asphalt — absorption into the insulation during the roof-membrane application.

    Polyisocyanurate is a closed-cell foam plastic insulating core sandwiched between organic or inorganic felt facers, glass-fiber mat facers, or glass-fiber-reinforced aluminum foil facers. A chlorine-free blowing agent expands the foam material, creating the closed-cell structure that gives the insulation its high thermal resistance. Air diffusion into the insulation cell structure results in a slight reduction of thermal resistance, but its insulating efficiency remains higher than other rigid insulation.

    Polystyrene insulation is made two ways: expanded and extruded. Expanded polystyrene consists of the polystyrene polymer impregnated with a foaming agent. The material expands when exposed to heat and is molded into a uniform, closed-cell insulating material. Expanded polystyrene is available in densities of 0.70-3 pounds per cubic foot (pcf). Most roof-covering manufacturers require a minimum density of 1.25 pcf.

    Extruded polystyrene consists of a blended polystyrene polymer heated and run through an extrusion process. The material is exposed to atmospheric conditions, which causes it to expand and create its closed-cell structure. Extruded polystyrene is available in densities of 1.3-2.2 pcf.

    Cellular glass insulation is composed of crushed glass combined with a foaming agent. The components are mixed, placed in a mold, and heated, which melts the glass and decomposes the foaming agent. This process causes the mixture to expand and create uniform, connected closed cells to form the insulating material.

    Gypsum board is a non-structural, non-combustible, water-resistant, treated gypsum core panel. The board is available with a proprietary, non-asphaltic coating on one side to enhance roof-membrane adhesion. Gypsum board typically is used as a cover board over foam-plastic insulations, as a thermal barrier over a steel deck, or as a vapor-retarder substrate.

    Exterior Specialties of PA is here to help with all of your roofing installation, roof repair and roof maintenance means. Call us today at (215) 773-9181 for your FREE estimate!

  • Types of Roofing Materials

    Here is an interesting video from Roofing FAQ on different types of roofing shingles.

     

    Exterior Specialties of PA is here to help you with all of your roofing maintenance, roofing installation and roofing repair needs. Call us today at  (215) 773-9181 for a FREE estimate!

  • What to Consider When Buying a Roof

    Courtesy of metalbuilding.com

    When choosing a new roofing system for you building or house, all the aspects of a roofing system might be difficulty to analyze. Here is a checklist, courtesy of FacilitiesNet, for you about important things to consider when buying a new or replacing a current roofing system.

    • Geographic Location:  This includes whether the property is located on the west coast or east coast, the north or south. But it also includes local considerations, such as the building's orientation and if there are nearby trees.
    • Local Environmental Laws: What is allowed as far as applications, odors, VOCs.
    • Building Characteristics: These include the slope of the roof, the shape of the building, the elevation and the level of accessibility to the roof.
    • Appearance: Is the roof visible from the ground or visible from other buildings such that you have concerns about looking industrial or maybe want more of a green look to it with vegetation?
    • Use of the Roof: How much foot traffic is going to be on the roof?
    • Use of the Building: A hospital or a resort has different concerns with roofing and reroofing than an office building or a shopping center, as far as disturbance to the inhabitants. A library or a bank many times have concerns with the equipment set up, the noise, the disturbance to the customers. It's another thing to look at environmentally. One roof may be easier and quieter to install than another, all things being equal.
    • Weather: Does a particular roof type have a vulnerability to hail, ice or snow damage? A particular type of roof may not be selected because of the incidence of hail in that area. Even if the owner is insured against hail damage, what is going to be effect of the inconvenience of having to go through a reroof?
    • Quality of Maintenance: What is the quality of maintenance that will be available? Will there be an in-house maintenance crew that can be trained and is interested in the condition of the roof?
    • Utility Costs: Is a reflective/cool roof important? For example, is the facility an office building where the owner is paying the utility cost or is the tenant paying the utility cost? It's a whole different animal. Some owners are very concerned about their tenant's utility costs as a selling point to keep their occupancy. Others don't care what their tenants have to pay; they just want a cheap roof.

    Exterior Specialties of PA is here to help you with all of your roofing installation, roofing repair and roofing maintenance needs. Call us today at (215) 773-9181 for a FREE estimate.

  • How to Take Care of a Roof Leak Before the Contractor Comes

    Since there have been a bunch of thunderstorms in the area lately, you may have noticed a roof leak issue.  You'll want to get it looked at by a professional contractor, but before they arrive, here are some tips to keeping that leak under control, courtesy of eHow.com.

    1. The first and perhaps most obvious place to look for a roof leak is directly above the leak in a ceiling or exterior wall. Use a flashlight to inspect the attic floor over the leak while it's raining. Look for standing water, water stains, mold, wet insulation or other exposed insulation.

    2. Examine the underside of the roof for wetness or mold around points of penetration (plumbing vents, chimneys), wherever different roof planes intersect (valleys) and near dormers. These symptoms indicate holes in the flashing or faulty flashing installation.

    3. A leak away from such locations suggests a problem in the roofing material. Keep in mind that water may travel sideways before passing through a joint in the roof sheathing, and may travel in a horizontal joint before falling on the floor or ceiling.

    4. Take measurements from points inside that you can also locate from outside. Measure down from a ridge and horizontally from the center of a valley or sidewall; or measure distances from a chimney or other point of penetration.

    5. If your ceiling is attached to roof rafters, as would be the case for a cathedral ceiling, all you can do from inside is take the measurements that will help you locate the leak externally, and attempt to control the damage internally.

    6. Water can travel on the underside of sheathing or down roof rafters before dropping off in one or more places. To control where it falls, tack a piece of string into the stream of water and let it hang into a bucket. The water will tend to follow the string.

    7. Poke or drill a hole in your ceiling to let the water through. This technique prevents the water from spreading across the top of the ceiling to other areas; it prevents the ceiling from becoming saturated, eliminating the chance of collapse and often the need for replacement; and it allows you to collect water from below using the string-and-bucket method.

    8. Using any measurements or other information you gathered indoors, make your initial outdoor observations from a ladder and/or using binoculars. Do not walk on a pitched roof during rain or as long as the roof is wet. A wood roof is particularly treacherous.

    9. Look for leaves and other debris slowing the natural downward flow of water, as often happens in valleys and adjacent to or above any roof penetration or dormer. If there is snow on the roof, an ice dam may have formed at the roof's lower edge, causing water to back up under overlapping layers of roofing materials. Remove the obstruction if you can get to it safely.

    10. If or when you can safely get close enough, examine metal flashings for corrosion or open joints where they connect to a chimney or other roof penetration. You can temporarily patch metal flashings, but replacement is the only permanent solution. Typically, you can replace cracked or dried-out rubber gaskets on plumbing vents.

    11. Pay particular attention to any areas already covered with black flashing cement; these indicate locations of previously repaired leaks. Look for pinholes or cracks, which often occur as the material ages. Make temporary repairs by applying flashing cement with a putty knife.

    12. If or when you can safely get close enough, inspect attachment points for any antenna, satellite dish or other object screwed or nailed into the roof. A dab of roof flashing in good condition should cover each fastener. The best solution is to avoid mounting anything on your roof in the first place.

    13. If you determined from inside that your leak is midroof and therefore not related to flashing, look for damaged or missing asphalt shingles. On wood roofs, look for cracked or badly cupped or warped shingles or shakes. Look for joints in one course that fall less than 11/2 inches (4 cm) to the left or right of a joint in the course below. Flat or nearly flat roofs generally require very close inspection to locate damaged or badly worn areas.

    Exterior Specialties of PA is here for any of your leak repair and roofing needs. Call us today at 215-773-9180 for a free estimate!

  • 10 Roofing Tips to Stay Safe and Maintain Your Roof

    There are a lot of precautions you need to take when doing things like cleaning your gutters and inspecting your roof.  Here are the DIY Networks "Top 10 Roofing Tips"

    1. Think Safety First

    Fussing to try and find a leak as soon as it happens is something that could put you in the hospital. Meddling on a roof while it's raining or covered with ice and snow isn't the ideal way to find a leak. Trying to temporarily fix a leak could be highly dangerous. If you want to do it right, there is no quick-fix. Just take your time, and be very patient and careful to wait for Mother Nature to give you the green light.

    2. Take Precautions

    Being on a roof will put the body in positions that are not comfortable or safe. Make sure to wear rubber sole shoes to prevent slipping. Also use a harness and always work with a buddy.

    3. Spray the Roof

    Take a garden hose and go up to the roof and start spraying in different locations to find the leak. Wait if it's wintertime because it's not safe to run water on the roof when it's freezing out.

    4. Keep Gutters Clean

    One of the most common areas and causes for roof leaks are clogged gutters. Gutters that have not been cleaned can cause the water to build up during rain.

    5. Avoid Dry Rot

    Dry rot isn't related to any type of water damage, but lack of ventilation. If a roof repair is right in the middle of the roof, there is a chance that the plywood might be deteriorating. The roof will actually sag in and cause the roof shingles to get brittle, crack and then leak. Preventing dry rot consists of installing a ridge vent, which will only work if there is a soffit vent. Holes have to be drilled through the soffit vents so cool air comes in through the bottom and pushes the hot air out through the top.

    6. Prevent Ice Buildup

    In the wintertime, ice has no problem building up under the roof membrane, shingles and gutters. The ice builds back up when it reaches the wall line where the house is heated and it creates an interior drip. Proper ventilation, rain and ice shields along with installing a drip edge will help prevent this problem.

    7. Fix Roof Boots

    Flashing, roofing, ice damping and skylights are all obvious places for potential leaks. One thing people often miss is the rubber boots. It's where the roof fence comes up that you find roof boots. If they dry up they will cause major leaks. It's a quick fix; purchase a new roof boot in a local hardware store. You may have to remove some of the shingles, lay a better tar under it and put it back in place.

    8. Inspect Materials

    Sometimes shingles are faulty and will begin to crack after they've been nailed down. Faulty installation with nails and shingles can also play a big part in leaks. Nails could be nailed too low and it will start pushing back up. Make sure to always check merchandise before getting on the roof.

    9. Check Valleys

    A valley is where the intersection of two roofs comes together. It is also called the ridge, which is again where two roofs meet at the top. Valleys are very common places for leaks because that's where the water from the entire roof goes to and it will start sloshing back and forth.

    10. Eliminate Leaks

    It's important not to get discouraged when a leak can't be found. It's a process of elimination. You've covered one area, installed the shingles back and sealed it watertight so at least one spot is eliminated. Now, you can try other areas.

    Exterior Specialties of PA is here to handle all of your roofing maintenance needs. Call us today at 215-773-9180 for your FREE ESTIMATE!

     

     

  • Important things to know about flat roof coatings

    Flat roof coating can be a great way for facilities to save money because they can extend the life of a roof and coatings lower the roofs temperature, making your building cooler and more efficient. However, choosing from all of the different roof coatings isn't easy.

    According to FacilitiesNet, it is harder for coatings to stick to hard, smooth," chemically inert surfaces" and easier on rough, irregular, "chemically active surfaces." Often, coatings stick better if a primer or base coat is used first. There are many different primers and base coats that are recommended for this. However, only base coats and primers recommended by the coating's manufacturer should be used.

    Call us today at 215-773-9180 for a free estimate! Exterior Specialties of PA is always there to assist with your roofing needs.

  • Is attic ventilation right for your home?

    Courtesy of buildingscience.com

    The amount of ventilation, or whether you even need ventilation for your attic is a subject that has been confusing for most consumers. This is in part because of the amount of research done. However, based on  the research to date, the strongest case for ventilating asphalt shingle roof assemblies with outside air is for residences located in cold climates and where snow accumulates on roofs for long periods of time, according to the National Roofing Contractors Association.

    Under the conditions mentioned above, ventilation has proven to be an important way to keep moisture out of your attic.

    To learn more, check out there article here.

    Exterior Specialties of PA can help with all of your roofing maintenance and roofing repair needs. Call 215-773-9180 today for a free estimate!

  • Roof Maintenance is Key to Saving Money in the Long Term

    A roof that isn't maintained properly may only last half of the time it was meant to. This could cost a great deal of money when it comes to replacing it. If you put aside 2 percent of your roof's overall cost every year for roof maintenance, you will most likely save a great deal of money, according to FacilitiesNet. Karen Warseck of FacilitiesNet explains:

    Say you have a 50,000-square-foot roof, with a 10-year design life. The cost to install it was $10 a square foot. That means the roof cost $500,000 to install. The cost per year of the roof is $50,000 per year. If the roof is not maintained, and it only lasts half of its design life, the yearly cost of this roof jumps to $100,000 a year. If that happens, in 5 years, you will need another $500,000 to replace it.

    The cost to maintain a roof averages about 2 percent of the roof installation cost per year. In our example, that means $10,000 a year. Over 10 years, that means $100,000. Spending that money to keep the roof maintained means the roof should last its full service life, which in turn means that you will only have to spend that $500,000 once. So even though you have spent $100,000 over the roof's service life, you may well have saved $400,000 by not having to replace the roof prematurely.

    Exterior Specialties of PA is always here for your roof repair and roof maintenance needs. Call anytime for a free estimate.