Tag: Lansdale Roof

  • Power-Assisted Roof Vents Can Boost Energy Efficiency

    Courtesy of House Logic

    While Soffit and exhaust roof vents can protect your home (and especially your attic) from heat buildup, there are other ways that may be more effective.  According to House Logic, "A power-assisted roof vent uses a motorized fan to suck hot air out of your attic, keeping your house cooler and drier while reducing potential problems such as rot, mold, and ice dams."

    Check out the benefits and costs of roof vents in this helpful article from House Logic:

    Power up your attic ventilation

    Power-assisted roof vents work even in still air and ensure vigorous ventilation. They relieve heat buildup in the attic, where temperatures can reach 150 degrees or more in summer. Reducing attic heat buildup prevents trapped, hot air from warming ceilings and radiating back into your living areas—a problem that also is avoided with proper attic insulation.

    Mount power-assisted roof vents near the roof peak on the back slope of the roof, where they are less visible from the street, or high on a gable end wall.

    Typically, a single power-assisted roof vent will service an average-sized home.

    Costs for power-assisted roof vents

    Power-assisted roof vents cost between $70 and $300, plus labor to install, and $2 or $3 a month to operate. For another $90 to $150, you can include an optional humidistat and thermostat, which turn on the fan when excessive humidity and/or temperatures are detected inside your attic space.

    If your attic lacks electrical wiring, it may be necessary to have a licensed electrician run a circuit or line extension to power the fan. Depending on the complexity of the project, figure on paying $50 to $100 per hour for a job that may take 2 to 4 hours.

    Going solar

    Solar-powered roof vents have zero operating costs and sell for $350 to $600. Some are eligible for state tax incentives and local utility rebates.

    Some builders complain that solar-powered roof vents may not work properly when it’s cloudy, and that these types of vents don’t pull enough air.

    Drawbacks of power-assisted roof vents

    While roof vents definitely remove hot air from attics, their effect on air conditioning needs is disputed.

    Some experts believe that because power-assisted roof vents evacuate hot air, they create negative pressures inside the home, drawing in hot outside air and increasing the load on existing air conditioning systems. However, this potential problem typically is avoided with the addition of adequate soffit vents, which allow fresh air into the attic.

    Another concern is that a roof vent adds another penetration through roofing materials, and that the vibrations caused by the motorized fan made lead to the failure of caulks and sealants, increasing the risk of water leaks.

    Exterior Specialties of PA is here to assist with all of your roof vent installation, roofing installation, roofing installation and roofing maintenance needs.  Call us today at (215) 773-9181 for your FREE estimate.

     

     

  • How Passive Roof Vents Can Help Your Home

    Passive roof vents provide ways for stale, moist air to escape from your roof.  According to Houselogic, "vents encourage natural air flow and work without the aid of motorized fans."

    Here is an overview of roof vents courtesy of Houselogic:

    How much roof ventilation?

    The rule of thumb for proper attic ventilation calls for a minimum of 1 square foot of vent area (openings) for every 300 square feet of attic floor space. If you have asphalt shingles, you must have some kind of attic ventilation or you’ll risk voiding the warranty.

    Check your roof vents

    You or a professional roofer should check your roof vents annually.

    • Periodically clear vent screens of dirt, leaves, dust, pollen, spider webs, bird nests, and other debris that impedes air flow.
    • Repair screen rips or tears and damaged flashing.
    • Check for rust or rot around the framing or flashing.
    • Clear insulation from soffit vent openings. You’ll need to inspect from inside your attic. Make sure attic insulation stops clear of the under-eave area.

    If you’re having problems with ice dams, mold, and damaged shingles, have a ventilation or roofing professional evaluate whether you have adequate ventilation and need to retrofit exhaust or intake vents.

    Roof vent options

    • Ridge vents run along the peak of the roof. They feature an external baffle to increase air flow and protect your house from snow, rain, and dust. They’re usually capped with a material that blends in with the roof. It costs about $245 for a professional to install a 40-foot ridge vent.
    • Static vents have no moving parts. They’re basically protected holes in the roof that allow air circulation. They come in various designs—roofline, dormer, roof louver, or eyebrow vents—and are installed in an even line across the roof. Some pros swear by them; others think they tend to leak. They cost between $35 and $50 per vent to install.
    • Gable vents, or wall louvers, are placed in the gable ends of the attic and can be used in combination with other vents. The higher they are, the more effective. However, the airflow from gable vents is limited because they’re under the roof deck, resulting in hot spots. Professional installation costs about $185 per vent. Or, buy a set yourself and install them for $45 apiece.
    • Wind turbines are mushroom-shaped caps atop roofs designed to catch natural wind currents, which spins an internal fan and propels hot air out of the attic. Wind turbines are most effective in areas where winds average about 5 mph.

    Exterior Specialties of PA is here to help with all of your roofing maintenance, roofing repair, and roofing maintenance needs. Call us today at (215) 773-9181 for a FREE estimate!

  • Tax Credits for Roof Replacement

    courtesy of houselogic

    Did you replace your roof in 2011? You may be eligible for a $500 energy tax credit, according to HouseLogic.

    The tax credit limits and deadlines are:

    • 10% of expenditures, up to $500 for the year, for all energy improvements combined.
    • A relevant roof must have been installed by Dec. 31, 2011.
    • Save receipts and labels.
    • For roofs, installation isn’t covered.
     Make sure to check out the Energy Star guidelines to see exactly what's covered.  As of  Jan. 2012, the government hasn't extended the tax credit into 2012.
    Exterior Specialties of PA is here to help you with all of your roofing needs. Call us today at 215-773-9181 for a FREE estimate.
  • Getting Cool Roof Rebates For Your Building

    If your building's roof is in need of replacing, a cool roof system should be a consideration. According to FacilitiesNet, some utility providers offer incentive for installing cool roof systems, and this alone should provide you with some incentive to look into cool roofing.

    However, if this hasn't sold you on it, "President Obama promising tighter efficiency standards for buildings and a system to cap carbon dioxide emissions, cool roofs are one way facility executives can ready their organizations," according to FacilitiesNet.

    In addition, you'll possibly get rebates from the gas and electric utilities of your building by going with a cool roofing system. The utilities usually pay back  a "certain percentage — usually about $0.20 on the dollar — after installation and documentation."

    Here is a list I compiled from FacilitiesNet of other rebate options for both commercial and residential buildings:

     In October of last year, President George W. Bush authorized the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008. Among the other legislation it contains, this law extends tax credits for use of ENERGY STAR-rated products — much like its predecessor — the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT).

    A tax deduction of up to $1.80 per square foot is available to owners or designers of new or existing commercial buildings that save at least 50 percent of the heating and cooling energy of a building that meets ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2001. Partial deductions of up to $.60 per square foot can be taken for measures that meet the criteria for any one of three building systems: the building envelope, lighting, or heating and cooling systems. These tax deductions are available for systems “placed in service” from January 1, 2006 through December 31, 2013.

    Another way facility executives may find some cash is some cities and states also award incentives to facilities that are voluntarily built to the rating systems for green or sustainable building systems — such as Green Globes or the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED)

    Many cities, Chicago among them, mandate minimum values. In Chicago’s case, however, the city government also provided grants to further spur cool-roof use. About a year and a half ago, the city announced $185,000 in grant money — equivalent to approximately 55 grants of $6,000.

     Exterior Specialties can help you with all of your roofing installation, roofing maintenance and roofing repair needs. Call us today for a free estimate!
  • Types of Roofing Materials

    Here is an interesting video from Roofing FAQ on different types of roofing shingles.

     

    Exterior Specialties of PA is here to help you with all of your roofing maintenance, roofing installation and roofing repair needs. Call us today at  (215) 773-9181 for a FREE estimate!

  • Why a Spring Roof Inspection is Important

    With the harsh Pennsylvania winter fading and spring starting to show itself, it's easy to forget about home maintenance. However, one of the best things you can do for your home is to get a spring roof inspection -- it can save you tons of trouble, time and money in the long-run.

    Each winter, your roof takes a beating. With constant temperature fluctuations, heavy snow and lots of rain, your roof is often exposed to the worst of the worst during the winter months. Therefore, there's a chance that a problem may exist on your roof -- whether it's the result of an ice dam, black algae or a roof/skylight leak -- and although the problem may be small now, it should be caught ASAP. A small problem now can lead to a giant problem later.

    And as always, we'd love to perform your spring roof inspection! Call Exterior Specialties of PA for a free consultation today!

  • Turning old roofing into flooring

    Recycling is, and has always been, a great  way to increase efficiency while also protecting our environment. In the past, we've talked about other ways to increase efficiency like photovoltaic roofs, cool roofs and even the benefits of a vegetative roof, but we haven't really talked that much about roof recycling.

    Thanks to the Duro-last blog, we ran across a pretty cool video that documents how took the material from their own roof and made it into flooring.

    Check it out below and tell us what you think!